History of Marrakech

The history of Marrakech, Morocco:

Learn about the interesting past of Marrakech, from the time it was established by Yusuf ibn Tashfin, ruler of the Moroccan Almoravid empire, to the present day.  With Morocco travel itinerary you can start a desert trip from Marrakech. 

Marrakech's history:

Yusuf ibn Tashfin, the Moroccan Almoravid empire's ruler, established Marrakech in 1062. He is also one of the world's most visible figures, advocating an Islamic system in the country, as well as Muslim Spain and the Morocco. The Almorabit dominion founded Marrakech as its capital.

In 1147, the Almohads, a new religious force from the High Atlas, conquered Marrakech from the Almoravids, and Almohad Caliph Abd al-Mu'min declined to enter the capital, claiming that the mosques in Marrakech were not properly orientated.

Abd al-Mu'min ordered the building of two mosques a few years back, one of which is the famed Koutoubia Mosque, which was influenced by al-Andalus (Andalusian) Islamic architecture. As a result, it resembles the bell tower of the Seville Cathedral.

Marrakech was conquered by al-Ma'mun of the emerging Marinid dynasty in 1230. His brother Abu Yusuf Yaqub forced the Almohads to flee to the Atlas Mountains, and the Marinids controlled Marrakech for the next two centuries. The city was largely neglected during this period, when the dynasty relocated its capital to Fez.

The Wattasids succeeded the Marinids as a dynasty, and the Sharifian families drove them out.
The Sharifs are descended from Ali, Muhammed's cousin, and Fatima, Ali's daughter. The new Moroccan royal family is the Alaouite dynasty, which derives its name from the word Ali.

During the sixteenth century, the Saadians made Marrakech their capital. The Bab Doukkala Mosque, the Ben Youssef Madrasa, and the Saadian Tombs are among the most well-known examples of this period's architecture.

Marrakech has experienced the same episodes as the rest of Morocco, in which the Portuguese, Spaniards, and French invaded the region, sometimes to defeat pirates, and other times in retaliation for being too lenient on piracy. But, in general, to maintain leverage of natural capital and its advantageous position as Africa's gateway.

Marrakech in 1911:

Morocco has few stretches of stability until 1956, when it declares independence. For decades, it had piqued the imagination of a number of European countries, who struggled tooth and nail to maintain power over it.

Rabat became the capital of Morocco in 1911, and Marrakech became the capital of the country's mid-southwestern region. The city's economy is currently dependent on tourism, as well as farm goods, which are mostly exported to Europe, and canned vegetables. It is the commercial hub of the area, and it is from here that the Atlas minerals are transported.

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    27 Aug 2019
    Tomas Mandy

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    1. author
      27 Aug 2019
      Britney Millner

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    27 Aug 2019
    Simon Downey

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